Trulia Looks to Boost Accuracy of Data on Listings by Going Direct to Brokers

Addressing some of the concerns we vocalized early this week with other agent websites, Trulia announced it is joining rival Zillow in offering incentives to brokerages that provide the real estate search portal with listings, including unlimited photos and property descriptions, and prominent identification of broker and agent contact information.

Some brokers and agents have questioned the value of syndicating listing data to third-party sites like Zillow, Trulia and Realtor.com, voicing objections about lead forms for competing agents that appear next to some listings on the sites. There have also been complaints that third-party sites sometimes publish inaccurate or out-of-date information.

The new program will deliver weekly reports to participating brokers to help them track the number of leads their listings generate on both the website and mobile apps.

Zillow announced a program in June to take listings directly from real estate brokerages to improve the accuracy of listing data, instead of relying on intermediaries like ListHub and Point2.

Those intermediaries, or syndicators, take listings data from brokerages and multiple listing services and distribute them to multiple websites (Realtor.com, thanks to its ties to the National Association of Realtors, gets listings directly from MLSs).

“We are committed to help you, and your agents, succeed,” Trulia’s head of industry relations, Matt Dollinger, said today in announcing the launch of the Trulia Broker Program. In the next few days, he said, Trulia will also be announcing “an exciting new product designed specifically for brokerages.”

  • Florence_M

    Can’t wait to see what the product is – hopefully it will be more helpful than this one!

  • Gwen_Reynold

    I think the sites help a lot – I am definitely doing much better and my listings are always accurate. I check Zillow and Trulia quite often, Realtor.com not as much

  • Jane

    It’s strange that Zillow and the likes would have taken info from intermediaries in the first place, but glad they figured out cutting the middle man was a better idea.